More Information About the Replacement Takata Airbag Recall

Replacement Takata Airbag Recall: What You Need to Know (Part II)

Honda recently issued a recall of vehicles equipped with replacement Takata airbags, but this is far from the first time Takata and Honda have faced issues — and it’s just one facet of an ordeal involving many automakers.

In our last blog on the recent airbag recall, we explored the circumstances surrounding the defective replacement airbags. Now, we’ll delve into the broader trend of airbag inflator malfunctions.

Airbag Inflator Injuries: By the Numbers

The 2018 crash that prompted the latest Takata recall is just one in a series of incidents involving airbag inflators. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, at least 250 drivers and passengers in the United States have suffered injuries due to airbag inflators, with a tragic 15 individuals dying.

Recent airbag-related injuries and deaths have prompted the largest recall in automotive history. Some estimates suggest that over 70 million inflators will ultimately be recalled. The overarching recall effort involves not just Honda, but several other top automakers.

Honda’s Complicated Relationship With Takata

This isn’t the first time Takata has caused problems for Honda. In 2015, the automaker severed ties with Takata, citing the “misrepresentation and manipulation of test data” for select inflators. What makes this latest recall especially unusual, however, is that Honda already issued a similar recall several years ago. For many drivers, this will be the second time they have to deal with a Takata recall for the same vehicle. Unfortunately, some of the initial fixes still present considerable danger.

Were you or a loved one harmed due to an airbag inflator from Takata or some other manufacturer? Look to Regan Zambri Long PLLC for assistance. With this proactive legal team at your side, a favorable outcome is possible.

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Source: RHL Law